kambo

Kambo

Overview

Kambo, also known as Sapo or Kambo medicine, is a traditional ritualistic practice involving the use of the secretions from the skin of the giant leaf frog (Phyllomedusa bicolor) found in the Amazon rainforest. The dried secretions are applied to small burns or superficial wounds on the skin, where they are absorbed into the bloodstream. Kambo has been used for centuries by indigenous tribes for its purported physical and spiritual healing properties.

Experience

The Kambo experience typically involves a brief but intense period of physical and mental discomfort. After the application of the Kambo secretion, individuals often experience nausea, vomiting, sweating, increased heart rate, and other flu-like symptoms. Some describe it as a “purge” as the body rids itself of toxins. The experience usually lasts about 20-30 minutes.

Effects

Physical EffectsKambo is believed to have detoxifying properties. It may induce vomiting and diarrhea, leading to the expulsion of toxins from the body. The increased heart rate and sweating are also considered part of the purification process.
Mental and Emotional EffectsSome users report a heightened sense of alertness, clarity, and a feeling of being more connected to nature and the world around them.

How to


Consuming Kambo, the secretion from the giant leaf frog (Phyllomedusa bicolor), is a practice rooted in indigenous traditions in the Amazon. It’s important to note that this is not typically “consumed” in the way we think of eating or drinking substances. Instead, it involves a specific application process on the skin. Here’s a general outline of the traditional method:

  • Small burns (called “gates”) are made on the skin, usually on the arm or leg. The top layer of skin is removed to expose the dermis beneath.
  • The Kambo is mixed with water to form a paste and then applied to the open wounds. This method allows the peptides in Kambo to enter the bloodstream more directly.

Can you mix it with other substances? Click here for a detailed chart of safe drug combinations.

Benefits & Risks

BenefitsDetoxification: Kambo is often touted as a detoxifying agent, and it’s believed to cleanse the body of impurities.
Pain Relief: Some users claim that Kambo can provide relief from chronic pain, inflammation, and various physical ailments.
Mental Clarity: Some individuals report enhanced mental clarity and focus after a Kambo session.
RisksAdverse Reactions: Kambo can lead to severe nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. In some cases, individuals may experience dizziness, fainting, or severe allergic reactions.
Legal and Safety Concerns: The use of Kambo involves burning the skin and introducing a substance into the bloodstream, which can pose health risks. It is essential to ensure proper hygiene and safety during administration.
Individual Variability: The effects and tolerance to Kambo can vary widely between individuals.

Therapeutic Use

Kambo is used by some as a complementary therapy for various health conditions, including chronic pain, addiction, depression, and anxiety. It is important to note that its efficacy and safety for these purposes are still being researched and debated.

Personal Growth

Some users describe Kambo as a tool for personal growth and spiritual development. They believe that the challenging experience helps them gain insight, purge negative energy, and connect with nature on a deeper level.

Legality

The legality of Kambo varies by country and region. In some places, it is considered illegal, while in others, it may be allowed for specific purposes, such as religious or therapeutic use. It is crucial to research and understand the legal status of Kambo in your jurisdiction.

History & Stats

Kambo has been used by indigenous Amazonian tribes for centuries, primarily by the Matses, Mayoruna, and Katukina people. It gained popularity in Western cultures in recent decades as an alternative healing practice. Exact statistics on its use are limited, as it remains a niche practice.

Myths

There are various myths and misconceptions surrounding Kambo, such as:

  • Kambo is not a hallucinogen, so it does not induce psychedelic experiences like ayahuasca or psilocybin.
  • Some myths claim Kambo can cure serious illnesses like cancer, but there is no scientific evidence to support these claims.
  • The belief that Kambo can make an individual physically stronger or more resilient is also a myth, as its effects are temporary and can be accompanied by risks.

It’s important to approach Kambo with caution and understand its effects and risks. Have you had an experience with Kambo and need support to integrate it? Or do you plan on having one and want the best setting possible? Book a session with one of our coaches.